Request Metrics for Node.js

Our npm package can now send us request metrics for Connect, Express and other Node.js web frameworks (or you can roll your own!).



Honeybadger for Go (golang) v0.0.3 released

Last week we released some improvements to our Go client, which reports panics and errors from Go applications. You can now configure the client to ignore errors in development/test mode.






Honeybadger + Python

Attention Pythonistas: Honeybadger now supports reporting exceptions from Python and Django applications!




How to report Node.js errors from AWS Lambda

We've created our own Node.js template to automatically monitor AWS Lambda functions for errors. In this post we'll teach you how to report errors from your own Lambda functions.



Writing command-line apps in Ruby

In order to write a first-class command-line app, you have to understand a lot of details like arguments, environment variables, STDIN/STDOUT, and more. This post is my humble attempt to cover most of these details and bring together everything you need to know in one place.


2015 Honeybadger Year in Review

I'm always amazed when I think about how much our tiny team of engineers is able to accomplish in a year. So I thought it'd be fun to make a highlight reel of the things we're proudest of this year.


How HTTP headers get passed from nginx to your Ruby app

Whether you use rails, Sinatra, or Lotus, you don't really have to think about how cookies and other headers pass from nginx or apache, to the application server and into your app. We're going to examine this journey in a little more depth. Because it turns out that the story of headers contains a lot of interesting information about the history of the web.


How does ARGV get set in Ruby?

You probably know that Ruby sticks any command-line arguments into a global array called ARGV. But why the heck is it called ARGV? It's an interesting history lesson that highlights Ruby's origins in C.


Announcing OpsGenie Integration

We are super excited to announce that Honeybadger and OpsGenie now work together. Now you can route Honeybadger alerts through to the developer on-call!


Working with Fractions and Rationals in Ruby

Most people are able to think about fractions a lot more easily than they can think about arbitrary decimal numbers -- when was the last time you measured out 0.65739 cups of flour? This post will discuss how to use ruby to work with fractions, and how you can convert gnarly floating point numbers, to nice fractional approximations.


Level Up Your Command-Line-Fu With Ruby

To really master the command line you have to master dozens - if not hundreds - of small utility programs. Fortunately, it's possible to replace a lot of these single-purpose tools with a general-purpose programming language like Ruby. This post will show you how you can use your Ruby skills to level up your command-line game.