Monitoring for non-application errors on Heroku

When your service fails due to an exception in your application code (Ruby, Go, Elixir, etc...), Honeybadger alerts you. Unfortunately, application errors are only half the story. What happens when something goes wrong outside of your application code? You probably use something like our Uptime Monitoring to be alerted of catastrophic outages such as when EC2 is down, DNS fails, or one of the other myriad scenarios play out.

Announcing Honeybadger for Java

We are very proud to announce that Honeybadger now officially supports reporting exceptions and errors -- with advanced features such as nested exceptions and request data! -- from Java web applications.

New and Improved Search

Over the past few months we've been working on delivering an improved search experience for Honeybadger customers, and today we're happy to announce that it's finally ready.  Our goal was to provide more advanced search options for the data you've been sending us while keeping simple searches simple, and I think we've accomplished that.  We'll still support the simple "just enter some text to do a quick wildcard search", but now we'll also support more specific searches, like the following:

Ditching your single page app for...turbolinks?

You tried turbolinks, once, and soon your app began to fail in strange and wonderful ways. But some people make it work. What's their secret? The answer is so simple, it just might amaze you.

Creating Ruby enumerators on the fly

When you treat your collections as enumerators, you get to use all your favorite functions like #map and #reduce without having to write any extra code. In this post I show you how easy it is to create enumerators on the fly, without defining extra classes or messing around with the Enumerable module.

When to use freeze and frozen? in Ruby

These days it's pretty common to see #freeze used in Ruby code. But it's often not entirely clear WHY freeze is being used. In this post we'll look at the most common reasons a developer might freeze variables.

How to exit a Ruby program

If you want your app to behave well in a unix environment, it's important that it exit correctly. In this post you'll learn all about unix exit codes, the mechanism that Ruby uses to exit a program, and how you can add custom behavior on exit.

Introducing Honeybadger for Elixir

Good news Elixir fans! Honeybadger now supports exception monitoring for Elixir. Let's take a look and see how easy it is to get started.

Avoid these traps when nesting Ruby modules

But buried within Ruby's nesting implementation - and Rails' autoload system - are a few traps that can cause your code to fail in strange and wonderful ways. In this post, we'll discuss the origin of these traps and how you can avoid them.

Mixing code and data in Ruby with DATA and __END__

Did you know that Ruby provides a way for your script to use its own source file as a source of data? It's a neat trick that can save you some time when writing one-off scripts and proofs of concept. Let's check it out!

Associative arrays in Ruby...what?

Have you ever had a bunch of data in an array, but needed to do a key/value lookup like you would with a hash? Fortunately, Ruby provides a mechanism for treating arrays as key-value structures. Let's check it out!

Honeybadger now supports causes / nested exceptions

Ruby 2.1 and later support nested exceptions via the Exception#cause method. Now you can view these for any error reported to Honeybadger. This post gives a brief introduction to exception causes in Ruby, and shows you what they look like in the Honeybadger UI.

How to raise any object as a Ruby exception

It's a common misconception that the raise method only accepts exceptions as its argument. This post will show you how you can raise ANYTHING, including numbers, dates, and your own custom classes.

How Rails' fancy exception page works

One of the nice things about working with rails is that when something goes wrong in development, you get a really nice error detail page. Today we're going to take a look at how these fancy error pages work.

How to clear all Sidekiq queues, using the power of emoji

It’s easy to find code snippets that will delete the jobs from one Sidekiq queue. But we have *lots* of queues. I want to clear the jobs from all of them. After a little digging, I came up with an answer that seems to work well.